Curatorial Practice

The Third Muslim: Queer and Trans* Muslim Narratives of Resistance and Resilience

The Third Muslim: Queer and Trans* Muslim Narratives of Resistance and Resilience (The Third Muslim) is a series of curated events and a mixed­media exhibit organized by Zulfikar Ali Bhutto and Yas Ahmed. The Third Muslim will create a platform that promotes visibility of artists within the queer and trans* Muslim communities; simultaneously, the project will build an archive of collective and individual stories of queer and trans* Muslim claiming space. TTM will debut as part of the 2018 Curatorial Residency Program at SOMArts Cultural Center in San Francisco, CA. The exhibit portion will blur lines between fine art and documentary, and objects in the form of photo documentation, articles, ‘zines and social media posts will be displayed alongside work by emerging and established artists who seek to pave the way for their own self­representation. In addition to the mixed­media exhibit which will be accessible to the public throughout the month, there will be two free companion events, including a live performance and an interactive community dialogue.

The show will be opening on January 25th through to February 25th 2018

See more information here:

http://www.somarts.org/thethirdmuslimartistcall/

 

Is Saye Kay Parcham Talay

Is Saye Kay Parcham Talay, The Shadow Over our Flag, was the first project of its kind in Pakistan and was co-curated by myself and cultural producer Abdullah Qureshi.  A traveling art show that seeks to build bridges between artists and their wider community, and invites people into difficult but necessary conversations. As well as tackling issues of marginalization and minority politics in Pakistan, Is Saye Kay Parcham Talay looks at ethnic, religious and gendered communities in the country and within art institutions themselves.

The show took the form of five events including our opening show in Lahore at Gallery 39K.  These spaces include the Jamshed Memorial Hall, The Second Floor, Indus Valley School of Art & Architecture and 71 Clifton. In choosing not to exhibit at commercial galleries, we investigate the effects that physical spaces have to marginalize people. The premise of Is Saye Kay Parcham Talay is to understand difference and diversity, to absorb the cultural contexts of Lahore and then Karachi.  In this way, we hope to be part of a growing movement that broadens the boundaries of what we as a society have labeled as art.  The works that were displayed included those composed by death row inmates and nearly 25 children photographers from Karachi’s Neelum and Shah Rasool Colonies.  They will sit alongside the works of artists from a wide array of backgrounds whose collective work observes a fractured nation.

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Jamshed Memorial Hall Courtyard Aysha Bilal (photographs) and Maryam Hasnain (foreground installation

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Indus Valley School of Arts Mohan Das
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Indus Valley School of Arts Featuring the work of Farida Batool Faiza Butt Aneeq Haider Ayaz Jhokio Mohan Das Ahmad Ali Manganhar Adnan Ali Manganhar Ali Sultan Nad-e-Ali Hira Nabi Samreen Sultan Sarah Kazmi

 

 

Young Street Photographers

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Young Street Photographers, Exhibition opening, Image courtesy of Humayun Memon, 2016
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Young Street Photographers, Exhibition opening, Image courtesy of Humayun Memon, 2016
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Young Street Photographers, Exhibition opening, Image courtesy of Humayun Memon, 2016

Young Street Photographers is a project that seeks to broaden definitions of art and artists. Young people, anywhere between the ages of 8 and 20 are given disposable cameras and given the freedom to take pictures of whatever they believe is worth taking pictures of.

In the summer of 2015 twenty children from a small Hindu, Christian and Sikh neighbourhood in Neelum Colony were given disposable cameras for 10 days to take photographs of the world around them.

 

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